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MARMOT Ether DriClime Jacket

posted Mar 20, 2013, 3:56 PM by GoOut Project   [ updated Jun 18, 2013, 12:59 PM by Italo Balestra ]



The MARMOT Eather is a slim-fit hooded jacket that combines a lightweight insulating layer with a windproof and water repellent shell to protect from the elements.

CONSTRUCTION

The outer fabric of the Ether is a lightweight, dense weave nylon Ripstop with DWR treatment, while the interior is composed of a thin layer of DriClime®, which is designed to absorb and convey moisture toward the outer layer.

The DriClime® is a soft two-component fabric developed by Marmot which mechanically draws moisture away from the skin. As moisture moves from the inner to the outer fabric, it spreads out to speed the drying process.

The jacket has two hand pockets and a chest pocket. The cuffs are elastic and have no adjustments, while an elastic adjustable cord is present on the waist. The hood can be rolled up and stowed when not in use. On the underarms two inserts of knitted polyester mesh are present to increase ventilation.

Some special reflectors guarantee safety during night running-sessions.

ON THE FIELD


Weighting only 250 g, the Ether  is a relatively lightweight jacket. When wearing it, the first feeling is that of outstanding comfort and amazing lightness. The cut is well done, ergonomic, and allows great freedom of movement in all situations. We tested it in various aerobic activities and it has always behaved very well: always comfortable and highly breathable. The mesh inserts under the arms are always very effective in providing ventilation, allowing excellent exchange of air in any condition.

But where we really put the Ether to the test was in running, the activity in which it is usually most difficult to find the right balance between breathability and protection from the elements. Even in the hardest tests we were never disappointed.

Performances have been more than satisfactory even in the rain, thanks to the effective DWR treatment.

The Ether is a perfect garment to wear as an external layer for a wide range of activities in cold temperatures. However, also in case of severe cold we found it excellent as an intermediate layer to replace a fleece under a Hard Shell, inside which it slips very well enhancing freedom of movement. 

Despite its very little weight, the garment also offers a good protection from wind.

The hood can be rolled when not in use. A comfortable and convenient solution when you do not need to cover your head.

Marmot Ether DriClime Jacket


The jacket can be easily stowed into the chest pocket, packing in a very small volume (approximately that of a small sandwitch). This solution is certainly appreciated when you have to carry it in your backpack. 

CONCLUSIONS

The Ether Jacket is a great garment for a wide range of outdoor activities, thanks to its very good balance between protection, breathability, and insulation. It is one of the few garments that effectively protects and breathes. Very light and truly breathable, it is also an excellent alternative to Windbreaker garments, such as Windbloc, Windstopper, and similar. 

ALTERNATIVES

The Ether is one of the few outdoor garments that combines a lightweight lining to a windbreaker shell for aerobic activities, so it is difficult to find a true alternative to propose.  Although less insulating and with no lining, similar concepts can be found in the following garments:

  • Patagonia - Houdini
  • Mountain Hardware - Apparition
  • OR - Helium
  • Arc’Teryx - Squamish Hoody
  • The North Face - Verto Pro

Ether Jacket Field Test

PROS

  • Great versatility
  • Good breathability
  • Good protection/weight ratio
  • Good fit

CONS                                                   

  • Low tear resistance
  • No adjustment cords on the hood

 Weight  7/10
 Versatility  8/10
 Compressibility  7/10
 Fit  7/10
 Mobility  7/10
 Warmth  5/10
 Breathability  6/10
 Water Resistance  6/10
 Wind Resistance  7/10
 Tear Resistance  5/10
 Durability  5/10
 Total Score  6,3/10

Marmot Ether


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